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Business and UX Strategy Resources: January 2015

Business and UX Strategy Resources: January 2015

Business and UX Strategy Resources: January 2015 1146 651 Border Crossing UX

Here’s our round up of a number of user experience strategy resources we’ve come across recently.

How to choose the right UX metrics for your product (Google Ventures)

The Google Ventures team on how to make the most of data to inform how you evolve the user experience your product delivers. This post gives a clear overview of why it’s important that you the metrics you track and measure are aligned to the:

  • quality of experience your user’s have when they use your product
  • your business goals.

They then go on to provide how the HEART (Happiness, Engagement, Adoption, Retention, Task Success) and Goals-Signals-Metrics can help you get there.

If you’re not familiar with UX strategy, product management and analytics measurement models this post will definitely get you thinking!

Link to article 

 

Risk management of cyber security in technology projects (Gov.UK Blog)

.Gov.uk do it again! This publication sets out a number of guiding principles that are aimed at helping guide people who have to manage cyber security risks when making technology decisions.

“Effective decision making in technology projects requires the balancing of user needs, security and other important factors. This guidance sets out principles which support effective decision making. We have developed these principles based on our experience and following a detailed analysis of risk management approaches taken in three real world projects.”

The eight principles they’ve proposed are:

  • Accept there will always be uncertainty
  • Make everyone part of your delivery team
  • Ensure the business understands the risks it is taking
  • Trust competent people to make decisions
  • Security is part of every technology decision
  • User experience should be fantastic – security should be good enough
  • Demonstrate why you made the decisions – and no more
  • Understand that decisions affect each other.

Link to article

 

Why corporate skunk works need to die (Steve Blank)

“In the 21st century market share is ephemeral – ask General Motors, Blackberry, Nokia, Microsoft, Blockbuster, etc – disruption is continual.” Steve Blank explains the thinking behind skunk works, why they proved so successful in the 20th century and why they simply won’t work in a 21st century market.

Link to article

 

The next wave of SMB SaaS: True solutions, priced as such (SaaStr)

An interesting post looking at the differences between the buying patters of Large Enterprises and SMBs and the implications this has on growth and exits.

Link to article 

 

Redesigning your website? Don’t ditch your old design so soon (Nielsen Norman Group)

You can always learn from what’s gone before is the crux of this post. Yes, you may want to ditch your old website but the truth is:

“Your old site is the best prototype of your new site: it’s already fully implemented and it solves exactly the design problem you’re targeting: a website for your business.”

So you should use your old website as the starting point for your next one by gathering feedback and using this to inform the next design. In short, testing your website’s existing design along with a few competitor websites will provide you with a number of valuable insights you should consider when assessing the design of your new website.

Link to article 

 

Got time for more?

Other business and user experience UX strategy articles worth a read:

Co-Creation: Designing With the User, For the User (UX Booth)

UX for the Enterprise (A List Apart)

 

Next week’s links

Next week we’ll be sharing some of the user experience design resources we’ve come across and bookmarked lately.

 

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